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Nilgiri - Tiger Hill-FBOP Tea 1 oz

$1.75

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Description
TIGER HILL (Estate Black Tea) Country of Origin: India Region: Nilgiri - South India Shipping Port: Cochin Grade: FBOP (Flowery Broken Orange Pekoe) Altitude: 6000 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: An exceptionally flavory tending light liquoring tea. There is a very distinct fruity floral character that is unlike any other tea. Milk accentuates this appealing character. Infusion: Bright, tending coppery Information: Tiger Hill is a top estate in the Nilgiri district of South India. The soil and climatic conditions produce very distinctive teas. This Jan. production tea has a flavor profile that is unbelievable. You will taste a fruit-like floral character with satisfying thickness. Upon first sip don’t worry if you tilt your head slightly, raise your eyebrow, look down at the cup and exclaim under your breath “Wow, this is tea?? What have I been drinking before??” This quality is only available in Jan. and the average price during this time is generally between 2 to 3 times the price at other times of the year. What causes this flavor?? - the sun shines more intensely, there are fewer clouds, the temperature is cooler and there is virtually no rain - the perfect conditions for stunning tea. Tiger Hill has been producing tea only quite recently. This partially accounts for its high quality. Virtually all the tea on the estate is clonal. Clonal tea means that the majority of the tea bushes come from about 3 or 4 ‘mother bushes’. The mother bushes were selected because they made the best tea with above average yield. The estate first began production of tea in 1971 (young by tea estate standards!). The estate is quite small with 640 acres under tea cultivation which produce about 2.2 millions pounds of tea. The estate employs nearly 2000 people and is a respected employer noted for above average labor practices. Nilgiri is a mountainous region of Tamil Nadu State in southeastern India. The peaks of the Nilgiris rise abruptly from the surrounding plains to an elevation of 5000 - 8500 feet above sea level. Tea was first planted on an experimental basis in 1835 and the first commercial tea garden was at Thiashola Tea Garden which began operations in 1859. The tea at Thiashola was cultivated by Chinese prisoners of war, captured by the British during the Opium Wars. The climate of the Nilgiris allows tea to be produced all year round. The first flushes of the new season are picked from April until May and account for about 25% of the region’s total harvest. The 2nd flush - accounting for about 40-45% of the yearly crop is from Sept. to Nov., and lastly the third flush is from Dec. to Jan. The best teas are produced during January and August. Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help capture the floral character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Nilgiri - Nonsuch-BOP Tea 1 oz

$1.75

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Description
NONSUCH (Estate Black Tea) Country of Origin: India Region: Nilgiri - South India Shipping Port: Cochin Grade: FBOP (Flowery Broken Orange Pekoe) Altitude: 5000 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: A very flavourful tending light liquoring tea. Has an interesting almost fruity almost floral- like maltiness that is unique to teas from the Nilgiri area of India. Infusion: Bright, tending coppery Ingredients: Black tea Information: Nonsuch is one of the best Nilgiri district teas in league with Tiger Hill and Glendale. The Nilgiri area is in Southern Central India and certainly well suited to the production of tea. The cooler temperatures of the mountains and abundant rainfall ensure superb cropping conditions. Generally Nilgiri teas resemble better Ceylon teas but tend to be somewhat more delicate in their flavour. Nonsuch has a hint of fruitiness that is quite distinct to the Nilgiri area. In the world tea trade South Indian tea is highly valued. The estates are quite small and each estate’s taste profile is quite different from one another. During earlier times the USSR was very active in the weekly tea auction in Cochin bidding up prices to high levels. Due to the high prices achieved at auction the South Indian tea estates maintained good husbandry and production practices that allow them to receive a return that is generally higher than most other tea growing areas. Nilgiri is a mountainous region of Tamil Nadu State in southeastern India. The peaks of the Nilgiris rise abruptly from the surrounding plains to an elevation of 5000 - 8500 feet above sea level. Tea was first planted on an experimental basis in 1835 and the first commercial tea garden was at Thiashola Tea Garden which began operations in 1859. The tea at Thiashola was cultivated by Chinese prisoners of war, captured by the British during the Opium Wars. The climate of the Nilgiris allows tea to be produced all year round. The first flushes of the new season are picked from April until May and account for about 25% of the region’s total harvest. The 2nd flush - accounting for about 40-45% of the yearly crop is from Sept. to Nov., and lastly the third flush is from Dec. to Jan. The best teas are produced during January and August. Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help capture the floral character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Nilgiri - Glendale-OP Tea 1 oz

$1.75

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Description
GLENDALE (Estate Black Tea) Country of Origin: India Region: Nilgiri - South India Shipping Port: Cochin Grade: OP (Orange Pekoe) Altitude: 5500 - 6000 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: A flavory tending light liquoring tea. There is a distinct fruity floral character that has a delicious jammy/bakey note to the cup. Milk accentuates this appealing character. Infusion: Bright, tending coppery Ingredients: Black tea Information: Glendale is one of the premiere tea estates of the Nilgiri district and noted for its superb flavor with hints of jammy character. This quality is only available in Jan. and the average price during this time is generally between 2 to 3 times the price at other times of the year. Glendale is a large tea estate for the Nilgiri district. The estate is covers nearly 2 square miles (1181 acres/465 hectares) of which 1.5 square miles or 900 acres is under tea cultivation. The majority of the estate is clonal which accounts for the high quality of this tea. Clonal means that the majority of the bushes come from about 3 or 4 ‘mother bushes’. The mother bushes were selected because they made the best quality tea - clearly evident in the cup. The estate employs nearly 2500 people and if you consider the average family size is 4, the estate supports nearly 10,000 people, certainly a large social responsibility. More than 60% of the estate workers are women. Workers and their families are given accommodation on the estate and they are provided with schooling for their children, medical clinics for ailments and places of worship. Glendale is a model employer in Nilgiri Nilgiri is a mountainous region of Tamil Nadu State in southeastern India. The peaks of the Nilgiris rise abruptly from the surrounding plains to an elevation of 5000 - 8500 feet above sea level. Tea was first planted on an experimental basis in 1835 and the first commercial tea garden was at Thiashola Tea Garden which began operations in 1859. The tea at Thiashola was cultivated by Chinese prisoners of war, captured by the British during the Opium Wars. The climate of the Nilgiris allows tea to be produced all year round. The first flushes of the new season are picked from April until May and account for about 25% of the region’s total harvest. The 2nd flush - accounting for about 40-45% of the yearly crop is from Sept. to Nov., and lastly the third flush is from Dec. to Jan. The best teas are produced during January and August. Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help capture the floral character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Kenya - Milima-GFBOP Tea 1 oz

$1.75

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Description
MILIMA (Estate Black Tea) Country of origin: Kenya Region: Kericho - West of the Rift Valley Shipping Port: Mombasa - on the Indian Ocean Grade: GFBOP (Golden Flowery Broken Orange Pekoe ) * This is the best grade Altitude: 6000 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox - exceptionally well graded Cup Characteristics: A rich full bodied tea with floral-like flavour notes. The cup has thickness with a malty but lively character. A perfect all day tea. Infusion: Bright and coppery orange. Ingredients: Black tea Information: The Milima mark is manufactured at Saosa Factory which was built in 1929. This is the only factory in East Africa producing orthodox style leaf. This special mark is produced from a delicate clone, which was developed at African Highlands Produce, - Applied Research Department. The clone develops a distinct floral characteristic during the cooler months of June and July when the bush growth is slow. We only buy Milima at this time to obtain the best quality. The leaf is selected from the most suitable clonal bushes on estates Kaproret, Saramek and Chemase. Teas for Milima are grown at 6000 feet or higher. Milima means ‘mountain’ or ‘high place’ in the local Kenyan ‘Swahili’ language. After plucking first thing in the morning, the leaves are gently rolled in order to maintain the floral character and obtain the twisted leaf appearance. After 3 separate rolls, the leaf is allowed to oxidize before being dried, than then sorted into 3 primary grades. GFBOP, GFOP, GFBOP1. Each grade contains a good percentage of golden tips giving the leaf a similar appearance to premium 2nd flush Assam Orthodox teas of North India. The liquors of Milima are bright and orange in color, and impart a floral aroma and taste with a delicious malty almost Bordeaux like character. Tea is a very important product for Kenya. The industry provides employment for several hundred thousand people from the small holders through to the steamship companies that transport the tea around the globe. Tea is a relative newcomer to the Kenyan agricultural scene. Tea was started by British planters during the early to mid 1900’s. Many of these planters were feeling unwanted in India (India achieved independence in 1947) and migrated to Kenya. Despite a ban on the transfer of plants and information, these planters smuggled Indian tea plants into Kenya. The plants thrived in the Kenyan climate and today Kenya is the world’s second largest exporter of tea. Hot tea brewing Method: As with all top quality teas, scoop 2-4 teaspoons of tea into the teapot, pour in boiling water that has been freshly drawn (previously boiled water has lost most of its oxygen and therefore tends to be flat tasting, steep for 2-4 minutes (to taste), stir (virtually all the leaves will sink), pour into your cup, add milk (do not use cream) and sugar to taste - sit back and enjoy a fleeting moment in Kenya - maybe you’ll catch a glimpse of a cheetah! (An interesting note - This tea can be enjoyed with or without milk - milk tends to mask a few of the delicate floral nuances but adding milk highlights the malty flavor.) Iced tea brewing Method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [Please note - High quality tea can ‘cream down’, meaning it looks like you added milk. This is normal for high quality teas and there is nothing wrong with your iced tea. High quality tea has a higher percentage of tannins which cause the ‘creaming down’.

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Kenya - Kambaa-BP1 Tea 1 oz

$1.75

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Description
KAMBAA (Estate Black Tea) Country of origin: Kenya Region: Kiambu - East of the Rift Valley Shipping Port: Mombasa - on the Indian Ocean Grade: BP1 (Broken Pekoe 1) Altitude: 5900 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: CTC (cut, torn and curled) Manufacturer: Kenya Tea Development Authority (KTDA) Cup Characteristics: A rich full bodied tea with superb flavour. The cup has thickness and lively character. Excellent self drinker. Infusion: Bright and coppery Information: Kambaa is one of the premiere factories under umbrella of the KTDA (Kenya Tea Development Authority -a state run corporation). Each factory in the KTDA relies on the ‘small holder’ (small individual family farming unit) to provide the green leaf for the making of black tea. Within the KTDA there are 150,000 small holders supplying green leaf to 39 factories scattered throughout the tea growing districts of Kenya. Despite such a diverse supply of green leaf to the various factories there is very rigid quality control mechanisms in place which ensure that farmers tender top quality produce. Kambaa is consistently within the top 4 quality tea estates of the KTDA and indeed Kenya. Tea is a very important product for Kenya. The industry provides employment for several hundred thousand people from the small holders through to the steamship companies that transport the tea around the globe. Tea is a relative newcomer to the Kenyan agricultural scene. Tea was started by British planters after the Second World War. Many of these planters were feeling unwanted in India (India achieved independence in 1947) and migrated to Kenya. Despite a ban on the transfer of plants and information, these planters smuggled Indian tea plants into Kenya. The plants thrived in the Kenyan climate and today Kenya is the world’s second largest exporter of tea. Hot tea brewing Method: As with all top quality teas, scoop 2-4 teaspoons of tea into the teapot, pour in boiling water that has been freshly drawn (previously boiled water has lost most of its oxygen and therefore tends to be flat tasting, steep for 2-4 minutes (to taste), stir (virtually all the leaves will sink), pour into your cup, add milk (do not use cream) and sugar to taste - sit back and enjoy a fleeting moment in Kenya - maybe you’ll catch a glimpse of a cheetah! Iced tea brewing Method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [Please note - High quality tea can ‘cream down’, meaning it looks like you added milk. This is normal for high quality teas and there is nothing wrong with your iced tea. High quality tea has a higher percentage of tannins which cause the ‘creaming down’.

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Darjeeling - Tukdah-TGFOP Tea 1 oz

$2.00

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Description
TUKDAH (Estate Black Tea) Country of Origin: India Region: Darjeeling Shipping Port: Kolkata Grade: TGFOP (Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe) Altitude: 4000’ – 7000’ ft. above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: Bright, lively and full of flavor. Lovely muscatel character with a hint of nuttiness. An excellent 1st flush Darjeeling. Infusion: Golden yellow Ingredients: Luxury black tea Information: Tukdah estate, nestled high in the hills below the soaring majesty of the Himalayas is one of the shimmering jewels in the Darjeeling crown. The 557-hectare estate clings to the steep banks of the Teesta river valley downstream from Sikkim. It goes without saying that this corner of the globe is home to some of the most beautiful and arduous terrain on planet Earth. Even by Himalayan standards, the Teesta valley receives incredible amounts of rainfall. This comes in the form of great monsoons that wash across the landscape like a vast barrel being emptied from heaven. Accompanying the rain are great bolts of lightning that shake the hillsides like a passing elephant herd. Interestingly, the actual name Darjeeling means place of lightning. In Hindu mythology, legend has it that a thunderbolt thrown by Lord Indra, king of heaven, struck the ground in the surrounding woods. Tibetan monks subsequently began referring to the place as Dorje-Ling – Dorje meaning “thunderbolt” and Ling meaning, “place”. The monsoon rains appear during the first flush, a period of peak seasonal quality. The rain ensures that estate’s soil remains sufficiently wet for cultivating tea while the steep hillsides ensure that all rootstock is kept perfectly drained. Temperatures are cool - much cooler than in the neighboring growing region of Assam resulting in a markedly lighter cup overall when the product of the two are compared. Currently, 228 of Tukdah’s 557 hectares are under tea, a remarkable number when one considers the steep, mountainous conditions. The estate employs over 780 people and produces 220 Metric tons of finished tea per annum. All 220 of these are superb. And so they should be as the estate is run and operated by a well cared for workforce. The management of Tukdah provides all workers with free housing, schooling, hospital care and places of worship. (Production and operational excellence has earned the estate HACCP certification certified by SGS India.) And the tea? As mentioned, every drop of it is superb. For the full effect, begin with a pure white cup in order to fully appreciate the light, bright, golden liquor. Next, inhale the aromas and take note as your mind attempts to decipher wisps of sandalwood, the sweetish smell of damp forest canopy and plum. On the tongue, the unmistakable muscatel character for which Darjeelings are praised washes over your taste buds and fills the mouth with a lingering nutty finish. A cup fit for the god of heaven himself! Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). It is recommended to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ even though you may add milk and sugar if that is your preference. Iced tea-brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice - a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about! LE0707

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Darjeeling - Soom-1st Flush Tea 1 oz

$4.00

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Description
SOOM (Darjeeling) - 1st Flush (Estate Black Tea) Country of Origin: India Region: Darjeeling – Northern India Shipping Port: Calcutta Grade: TGFOP1 (Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe One) Altitude: Main elevation is 5300 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: Delicate muscatel character with excellent roundness. A superb top quality 1st Flush Darjeeling. Infusion: Bright tending slightly greenish Ingredients: Black tea Information: 1st Flush occurs in Darjeeling from March through to mid April, During this period the tea bushes have once again begun ‘flushing’ (read growing) after the winter dormancy period. Vigorous flushing occurs because the day time temperature has risen 5 to 7 degrees Celsius (from 10/12 C to 20 Celsius); the hours of daylight have increased (the vernal equinox has passed); and despite the fact that the weather is dry there is excellent moisture retention in the soil from the winter rains. All these factors in the rarefied mountain air help produce this stunning tea. The plucking fields of Soom are about 5200 feet above sea level and the terrain is very severe with some of the slopes approaching 45 degrees. The slopes are so steep that the estate still carries the green leaf to the factory by mountain pony. Many of the bushes are over 130 years old but produce remarkable tea; in fact it is not uncommon for some 1st Flush teas to be rushed to Germany in a race similar to the Beaujolais Run. The are several theories about the origin of the name of the estate. ‘Soom’ in Lepcha Language (local dialect) means ‘Three’ or ‘Triangular’ Interestingly the estate is bounded by three streams and is somewhat triangular in shape. Another school of thought is Soom also means ‘holy abode’ and as Soom has a holy deity who is worshipped, it is possible the name originated from here. The factory burned to the ground in 1995 and was out of production for 1 1/2 years. The new factory has all modern equipment, which now produce some of Darjeeling’s best teas. Top tea estates perform a social function and Soom is exemplary in this regard. The estate not only employs 700 people, but provides housing, food and medical needs for the families resulting in about 2000 people living on the estate in full view of the Himalayan Mountains. The are 3 main times of year for producing good quality Darjeelings: 1st flush - Springtime harvested teas from late Feb. to mid April. The young leaves yield a light tea with generally intense muscatel with ‘point’. A gentle afternoon tea. 2nd flush - Harvested in June, these teas are more fully developed. The liquor is bright and the taste full and round excellent muscatel. An superb afternoon tea that is especially good with scones and raspberry conserve. Autumnal - Not always available depending upon the weather, they are typified by a round taste and coppery liquor. Excellent as a breakfast tea with milk. Hot tea brewing method: This tea is best enjoyed using 2-3 heaping teaspoons for a 6 cup teapot. Allow the tea to steep for 3-5 minutes, remove the leaves and pour. We do not recommend adding milk or sugar since this can mask some of the intrigue and subtle nuances of this vintage tea. Iced tea brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].

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Darjeeling - Margaret's Hope-TGFOP Tea 1 oz

$2.50

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Description
MARGARET’S HOPE - Darjeeling - 2nd Flush (Estate Black Tea) Country of Origin: India Region: Darjeeling - Northern India Shipping Port: Calcutta Grade: TGFOP (Tippy Golden Flavoury Orange Pekoe) Altitude: 6800 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: A delicate tending astringent cup with the distinctive ‘Muscatel’ character. Hints of currant create an almost wine-like taste. Infusion: Bright tending light Ingredients: Black tea Information: During the 1930’s the garden was owned by Mr. Bagdon who lived in London but visited the tea garden regularly. He had two daughters. The younger daughter named Margaret; who when she saw the tea garden fell in love with it, hoping one day she would have an opportunity to return. Sadly she fell ill on board ship during the return trip to England and died soon after. In her memory, her father changed the garden’s name to Margaret’s Hope. It is believed that she visits the estate bungalow from the western side, coming through the main guestroom and leaving from the study through the verandah to the tennis courts. The bushes at Margaret’s Hope are almost entirely the Chinese Jat (genus) accounting for the green leafed tippy appearance of the manufactured leaf and the superb fragrance. Because the tea is grown at such high altitudes and in relatively cool weather the bushes do not grow quickly, and as such the production is limited. The best time of the year for quality is during ‘second-flush’ (end May - end June). During this time Darjeelings are incomparable to any other tea in the world. The fragrance and taste is a complex bouquet that reaches right out of the cup. Some would describe the taste as nutty; others find it reminds them of black currants, but most often it is described as similar to the taste and fragrance of muscat grapes. The are 3 main times of year for producing good quality Darjeelings: 1st flush - Springtime harvested teas from late Feb. to mid April. The young leaves yield a light tea with generally intense muscatel with ‘point’. A gentle afternoon tea. 2nd flush - Harvested in June, these teas are more fully developed. The liquor is bright and the taste full and round excellent muscatel. An superb afternoon tea that is especially good with scones and raspberry conserve. Autumnal - Not always available depending upon the weather, they are typified by a round taste and coppery liquor. Excellent as a breakfast tea. Hot tea brewing method: This tea is best enjoyed using 2-3 heaping teaspoons for a 6 cup teapot. Allow the tea to steep for 3-5 minutes, remove the leaves and pour. We do not recommend adding milk or sugar since this can mask some of the intrigue and subtle nuances of this vintage tea. Iced tea brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].

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Darjeeling - Makaibari Organic 1 oz

$3.00

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Description
MAKAIBARI ESTATE ORGANIC SFTGFOP-1 - A fine organic tea. Medium body, wonderful aroma and smooth taste. Brewing Insturctions: 1 tsp. per cup, boiling water, steep 3 - 5 minutes. _____ Makaibari is an aesthete's delight, a visual oasis sandwiched between dusty cities in the plains and the now deflowered tourist fable, Darjeeling, or Dorjee Ling, as the original Tibetan name went. The irradiant sunshine, the fragrance and the natural music of rustling leaves, singing birds and mooing cows, last only within the confines of Makaibari. And the white orchid has all but vanished from Kurseong, but can be found in Makaibari. Strange but true. The estate keeps two-thirds of its land under forest cover, taken care of by rangers native to the soil, a perfect example of people's management of forests, one of the gardens unique features. Complete holistic practice of biodynamics and Permaculture at the highest level; with its hundreds of birds, floral diversity, wildlife sanctum and a unique Stone House - the oldest in Darjeeling, complete with a biodynamic vegetable and herbs garden - Makaibari Tea Estates is one of the most enticing destinations for the genuine ecotourist. With a proud community that has its own say, through the joint body, in all developmental issues, where alone some men work under women supervisors despite being in a strongly male-dominated society, Makaibari is a way of life, not just a tea garden. Come and see the bio-gas in operation as a weapon in the armoury of the global campaign against deforestation. Or the six-tier forest cover, which is a higher version of Permaculture. And the mulching and explosion of nitrogen in the most natural, nonpolluting form. This is Rudolph Steiner's Biodynamic practice at its best. Yes, Makaibari Tea Estates has won the world record price for the best tea, the Silver Tips, a Second Flush muscatel style tea; yes, its tea is mostly pre-sold in European and American markets and now in Japan and a niché market in India; yes, the number of "firsts" are far too many. But these are dry statistics. For Rajah Banerjee, the fourth generation scion of the family who runs the world's oldest single-owner tea estate, these are the disposable "flavours in the balance sheet". A master tea-maker with exquisite choice and taste, mystique, not money makes Rajah's bedstead. Naturally, it is the only place where the miracle of the Tea Deva could happen, where the company logo is itself a legend.

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