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Ying Ming Yunan Tea

$1.75

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Yunnan Province
Shipping Port: Shangai
Grade: FTOP (Flowery Tippy Orange Pekoe)
Altitude: 4000 feet above sea level
Manufacture Type: Orthodox
Characteristics: Excellent fullness with subtle China sweetness. Only produced during March and April, when the mountain air is moist and cool.
Infusion: Bright, with an origin specific character.
Ingredients: China Black tea
Information: It is believed throughout the tea world that the Chinese province of Yunnan, which borders Laos, Vietnam, Burma, and Tibet, is the birthplace of the world's first tea plantations. However, in direct contrast to the soothing qualities of a cup of freshly brewed tea, the Yunnan tea plantations, if legend is to be believed, were the byproduct of a terrible war. According to ancient Chinese military texts, during the ancient period of the Chinese three kingdoms, (220-265 AD), a marauding army led by a General Kong Ming, (at the time one of the most feared men in China), conquered Yunnan province after invading it from nearby Hunan. Kong Ming, besides being a brilliant military strategist, was also a man of science, and specialized in botany. After conquering the province he conducted a thorough survey of its topography and biology and deemed it to be perfect for the cultivation of tea. Subsequently, the general ordered 1000 of his men to plant tea seedlings they had brought with them from Hunan and plant them throughout the highlands of Yunnan. Whether or not the legend of Kong Ming is to be believed, the environment and altitude of Yunnan province do create an absolutely perfect environment for growing tea. The tea there is grown at very high elevations ranging from 4500-6000 feet above sea level. (Interestingly it is the height that gives the province its name; Yunnan translates into English as "South cloud"). The altitude, combined with the warmth and humidity of the highlands creates a natural greenhouse that Yunnan tea plants thrive in. Ying Ming Yunnan, like most Yunnan teas is known by its full-bodied and slightly sweet flavor. Brew a cup of this fabulous tea yourself and the next time you hear the song "war, war, what is good for?" at least you'll know that it was good for at least one thing.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

Priced per 1 oz.

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Small Black Tea Brick

$18.15

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Anhui Province
Shipping Port: Shangai
Characteristics: Full bodied with slight must notes. Generally not used as a beverage
Infusion: Tending dull
Ingredients: 100% China Black tea
Information: Tea bricks are perhaps one of the most visually striking forms of processed tea in the world. The origin of the brick is rooted in the ancient spice trading routes of the ancient Far East in and around the 9th century. Traders and caravan herders transported everything they had by camel or on horseback so all goods had to be designed to take up as little space a possible. Tea producers wishing to export their product devised a way of compacting processed tea leaves by mixing it with stalk and tea dust and then pressing it tightly into forms and drying them in the sun. Centuries of trading made the tea bricks became so popular that by the 19th and even early 20th centuries, pieces broken from a brick were used as currency in Tibet, Mongolia, Siberia, and Northern China. The method traditionally used for brewing tea from a tea brick was to roast a piece over a flame until it turned reddish. The piece of brick was then crumbled and brewed in a pot. In some parts of China it was also customary to spice up the brew by adding onion, ginger, and orange. In Tibet, tea bricks were traditionally used to make the country's famous fermented yak butter tea. As for we North Americans however, if you find you have no fermented yak butter in the fridge, we recommend simply using regular milk - although most people nowadays like tea bricks simply for their aesthetic qualities. These tea bricks make a unique gift and a great conversation starter if placed in an upright plate holder.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Rose Congou Emperor Tea

$2.25

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Fujian Province
Shipping Port: Fuzhou
Grade: FOP (Flowery Orange Pekoe)
Altitude: 2500 feet above see level
Manufacture Type: Orthodox
Characteristics: Light liquoring with refreshing hint of roses.
Infusion: Light with touch of coppery color.
Ingredients: 100% China black tea, Natural flavors.
Information: Tea was reportedly discovered in China around 2737 B.C. by The Emperor Chen Nung when a tea leaf fell into his bowl of hot water. This tradition of tea drinking became a integral part of society and was the preferred beverage for all walks of life; from monks and mandarins to the nomadic tribesmen who traded horses for bricks of tea. The Japanese may have transformed tea drinking into a sacred ceremony, however, the Chinese are credited with initiating the time honored ritual of offering a guest a cup of tea as a sign of hospitality. Scented teas have been around for a long time and are produced according to ancestral recipes. Before the advent of essential oil extracts one of the easiest scents to duplicate was 'Rose'. The plantations would literally cut the rose blossoms from the plants bordering fields and pathways and sprinkle these into the tea. The result was a delicate but finely flavoured tea. Today the practice remains virtually the same, but essential oils are used to speed up the scenting process and freshly cut flowers are added to the tea for visual effects. The result is a delightfully attractive leaf accented with rose petals combined with the refreshing cleansing flavour of roses. The next time a guest drops by, why not offer a truly special cup of hospitality accented with the scent and petals of roses.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

Priced per 1 oz.

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Monkey Picked Golden Hunan Tea

$6.75

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Hunan Province
Shipping Port: Shanghai
Grade: Handmade Golden Leaf
Altitude: 4000 – 6000 ft. above sea level
Manufacture Type: Orthodox
Characteristics: Hunan's mountain climate accents the distinctive mellow, light oaky cup.
Infusion: Bright, with a light lingering toasty character and finish.
Ingredients: China Black tea
Information: Before brewing this tea we would like to offer a warning: Prepare yourself for what may be the best cup of tea you've ever had in your life! Without word of a lie, this is truly a truly fabulous brew. The tea itself is grown in the mountainous growing region of Hunan province, well-known throughout China as the "Tea Country in the South." Tea production is spread throughout the province with plantations and factories in almost every county, town, and village. Hunan province has been well known for centuries for producing some of China's finest teas - we're proud to offer this hand made Monkey Picked Golden as one of the best examples of the quality this region has to offer. In some regions of Hunan province, ancient local custom held that the first plucking of the tea bushes were to be picked by monkeys. This was due in part to their dexterity, which enabled them to pluck the highly delicate leaves, and also because it was believed that they brought good luck and would ensure an excellent harvesting season. Upon opening the bag, the first thing you'll notice is the golden color of the leaves - this is the color of the very top new buds of the tea bushes. These are plucked very early in the morning and then hand sorted during production. As you reach into the bag, run some of the leaf through your fingers. You will find them to be exceptionally delicate with a slight fuzzy feel to them - you can be sure that with leaf of this quality this tea is going to brew a very flavorful and delicate cup. And what a flavorful cup it is - mellow, with hints of oak and a savory mellow and toasty finish. This brew is to tea what the finest Bordeaux is to wine - pour a cup, sit back and enjoy.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

Priced per 1 oz.

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Lichee Congou Tea

$2.25

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Fujian Province
Shipping Port: Fuzhou
Grade: FOP (Flowery Orange Pekoe)
Altitude: 2500 feet above sea level
Manufacture Type: Orthodox
Characteristics: A leafy black tea infused with the flavor of lichee fruit producing a delightful naturally scented tea.
Infusion: Light with touch of coppery color.
Ingredients: China Black tea, Natural flavors
Information: Tea was reportedly discovered in China around 2737 B.C. by The Emperor Chen Nung when a tea leaf fell into his bowl of hot water. This tradition of tea drinking became a integral part of society and was the preferred beverage for all walks of life; from monks and mandarins to the nomadic tribesmen who traded horses for bricks of tea. The Japanese may have transformed tea drinking into a sacred ceremony, however, the Chinese are credited with initiating the time honored ritual of offering a guest a cup of tea as a sign of hospitality. Scented teas have been around for a long time and are produced according to ancestral recipes. Before the advent of essential oil extracts one of the easiest scents to duplicate was Lichee - a fruit that plays an important part in Chinese life. The plantations would squeeze Lichee fruits plucked from the trees which grew in the area. The result was a delicate and finely flavoured tea. Today the practice remains virtually the same, but essential oils are purchased in huge drums and used to scent the tea to meet the high volume demands from the global market. The next time a guest drops by, why not offer a truly special cup of hospitality.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

Priced per 1 oz.

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Large Black Tea Brick

$25.00

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Anhui Province
Shipping Port: Shangai
Characteristics: Full bodied with slight must notes. Generally not used as a beverage
Infusion: Tending dull
Ingredients: 100% China Black tea
Information: Tea bricks are perhaps one of the most visually striking forms of processed tea in the world. The origin of the brick is rooted in the ancient spice trading routes of the ancient Far East in and around the 9th century. Traders and caravan herders transported everything they had by camel or on horseback so all goods had to be designed to take up as little space a possible. Tea producers wishing to export their product devised a way of compacting processed tea leaves by mixing it with stalk and tea dust and then pressing it tightly into forms and drying them in the sun. Centuries of trading made the tea bricks became so popular that by the 19th and even early 20th centuries, pieces broken from a brick were used as currency in Tibet, Mongolia, Siberia, and Northern China. The method traditionally used for brewing tea from a tea brick was to roast a piece over a flame until it turned reddish. The piece of brick was then crumbled and brewed in a pot. In some parts of China it was also customary to spice up the brew by adding onion, ginger, and orange. In Tibet, tea bricks were traditionally used to make the country's famous fermented yak butter tea. As for we North Americans however, if you find you have no fermented yak butter in the fridge, we recommend simply using regular milk - although most people nowadays like tea bricks simply for their aesthetic qualities. These tea bricks make a unique gift and a great conversation starter if placed in an upright plate holder.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Lapsang Souchong Tea

$2.50

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Fujian province, Xingchun region
Shipping Port: Fuzhou
Grade: Special Leaf Lapsang Souchong
Altitude: 4000 – 6000 ft. above sea level
Manufacture Type: Orthodox
Characteristics: A smooth crisp character with the remarkable and heady aroma of a pine and oak wood fire.
Infusion: Tending bright with reddish hues
Ingredients: 100% Black tea
Information: This special smoked tea has a distinctive flavor sometimes referred to as tarry, and is a special tea from Fujian province. The Fukienese word 'souchong' means subvariety - that is a subvariety of other black teas from the Wuyi mountains of Fujian. When Lapsang Souchong was first exported to western European countries and became famous on the international markets - it was no doubt due to the distinct aroma and flavor. Interestingly the best Lapsang is produced in the nature preserve located in the Wuyi mountains where the high mountains with thick pine forests and heavy mist provide the ideal environment for growing top quality tea. Legend claims that the smoking process was discovered by accident. During the Qing dynasty, an army unit passing through Xingcun (Star Village) camped in a tea factory filled with fresh leaves awaiting processing. When the soldiers left and the workers could get back into the premises, they realized that to arrive at market in time, it was too late to dry the leaves in the usual way. So they lit open fires of pine wood to hasten the drying. Not only did the tea reach the market in time, but the smoked pine flavor created a sensation! The method of production is as follows: The leaves are first withered over fires of pine or cypress wood. After pan-frying and rolling, they are presses into wooden barrels and covered with cloth to ferment until they give off a pleasant fragrance. The leaves are fired again and rolled into taut strips. Then they are placed in bamboo baskets and hung on wooden racks over smoking pine fires to dry and absorb the smoke flavor. When finished they are thick, glossy black strips, and produce a dark red beverage with a unique aroma and taste. It is generally consumed with sugar or milk. Depending upon one's palate the taste can be light and intriguing or it can be heavy and overpowering. Lapsang Souchong is best described as an acquired taste.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

Priced per 1 oz.

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Keemun Hoa Ya A

$6.75

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Description

Country of Origin: China
Region: Anhui Province
Shipping Port: Hong Kong and Shanghai
Grade: Hoa Ya A
Altitude: 4000 – 6000 ft. above sea level
Manufacture Type: Orthodox
Characteristics: Complex and subtle. Excellent full bodied winey character with oaky notes
Infusion: Bright and golden coppery
Ingredients: 100% China Black tea
Information: Of all the China teas available Keemun is probably one of the best known. Keemun tea has a rich aroma and yields a full thick almost sappy beverage. Keemun tea originally was a common green tea until it was discovered that when allowed to ferment, the leaves produced a drink so fine that it has been termed the burgundy of China teas. Traditionally Keemuns were known as the classic English Breakfast tea - the best (read Hoa Ya A) are on the Queen's table. Perhaps this came about as some have described the taste and aroma of Keemun as reminiscent of toast hot from the oven. Keemun is one the best-keeping black teas. Fine specimens will keep for years if stored properly and take on a mellow winey character. Many tea connoisseurs claim that Keemun Hoa Ya A improves with age, taking on a deeper and more complex character. Hoa Ya A is extremely rare. Our supplier only produces 120 kilos per annum and in Anhui Province perhaps 1200 kilos is made on an annual basis. The leaf used to produce this tea is hand sorted even before it is fired; and then, sorted again! The result is a uniform wiry leaf, very dense and evenly sized. This tea is best enjoyed with milk. Milk gives the tea a mellow depth and accentuates the complexities of the flavour profile. This is one of the world's great teas.
Hot Tea Brewing Method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea 'straight-up'
Iced Tea Brewing Method: Not generally consumed iced but if you do, place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water].Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or 'milky' when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

Priced per 1 oz.

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