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Organic Wild Blueberry Tea 1 oz

$2.75

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Description
Intoxicating aroma with the flavor of wild blueberries. A pinch of sugar makes a stunning tea, iced or hot! ORGANIC WILD BLUEBERRY (Black Tea with natural flavors) Country of Origin: Sri Lanka Region: Uva Shipping Port: Colombo Grade: FP (Flowery Pekoe) Altitude: 5000 – 7000 ft. above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: Intoxicating aroma with the flavor of wild blueberries. A pinch of sugar makes a stunning tea, iced or hot! Infusion: Bright and Coppery. Ingredients: Luxury organic black tea, Hibiscus, Elderberries, Currants, Cornflower Petals, Natural Flavors Organic Credentials: The Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd. Certified Organic by QMI Organic Inc. Certificate #: Information: While you sit back and enjoy a cup of this fabulous organic tea we thought we’d share a few random facts about one of the world’s smaller fruits, the Wild Blueberry. To start with, would you believe that the wild blueberry bush is thought by some botanists to trace its ancestry back to the Garden of Eden? It’s true. Or, that the scientific name for blueberries, Vaccinium, comes from the Latin word for cow? Also true - although there is no concrete explanation for this beyond the notion that perhaps ancient cows knew the tiny little berries made for better eating than plain old grass. It’s possible - other animals love them. It is known for example that wild bears will travel for miles on an empty stomach to find berry patches, and will eat almost nothing else when they are in season. And speaking of traveling, it’s also a fact that if all the blueberries grown in North America in one year, roughly 120 million lbs, were placed in a line one after the other they would cover a four lane highway stretching from New York to Chicago. Hmm, what else? Oh yes, blueberries were a beloved fruit of Ronald Reagan and finally, July is national Blueberry month in the US while August is blueberry month in British Columbia. It’s a lot to remember for such a little berry. But then again, this is one little berry that packs a lot of flavor. In fact, when you bite into a fresh one, it’s almost hard to believe how flavorful they actually are. The flavor is dense, sweet on the tongue and essentially bursting with tannic juiciness. We’ve done our utmost to capture the flavor of the fresh wild berries by blending an all-natural flavoring with a top quality organic Ceylon tea. If you brew a pot, it’s a fact that you’re going to love it. It’s also a fact that you’re going to end up pouring another cup. It’s also a fact…ok…we’ve said our peace. Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea-brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about! LE0807

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Organic Peach Apricot Tea 1 oz

$2.75

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Description
ORGANIC PEACH APRICOT (Black Tea with natural flavors) Country of Origin: Sri Lanka Region: Uva Shipping Port: Colombo Grade: FP (Flowery Pekoe) Altitude: 5000 – 7000 ft. above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: Lusciously sweet peach essence enhanced with full flavor apricots. A delicious aroma wafts upwards and portends a cup of ecstasy. Infusion: Bright and Coppery. Ingredients: Black tea, Blackberry leaves, Calendula Petals, Natural Flavors CERTIFYING BODY: NASAA - Australia CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 8048 REFERENCE NUMBER: 8048 DATE OF CERTIFICATE: January 2005 Information: Did you know that the tea you are holding is lucky? First of all, it’s organic, so no pesticides or chemical fertilizers were used in its manufacture. Ok, that’s the result of careful organic processes more than luck, but it’s still a good thing! Secondly, peaches and apricots are both fruits that have been considered lucky by various cultures over the centuries. Ancient Japanese folklore tells the tale of Momotaro, the “Peach Boy”, born from an enormous peach his parents found floating down a river. Legends tell of Momotaro’s great adventures to help bring prosperity and peace to both his parents and his village. Half a world away, in old England, old tales deem Apricots to be good luck when they turn up in dreams. The ancients believed that such a dream would result in immediate prosperity and recognition for your deeds. Certain legends indicate that King Arthur himself dreamt of Apricots regularly. Metropolitan Tea Company belief maintains that if you combine the two flavors with a high grown organic Ceylon you have what is one of the finest flavored teas on the market - lucky for our sales department, and for your taste-buds! This tea is a delight. The citrus flavor of peach swirls and mixes with the sweetness of apricot in a way that tingles the tongue. Try a cup with a dash of milk, and a touch of sugar – then let us know how you do in the luck department! Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character on this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea-brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Organic Monk's Blend Tea 1 oz

$2.75

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Description
Light fruity grenadine lifts exotic caramel vanilla creating a unique heavenly flavor. Excellent smooth and mellow finish. ORGANIC MONK’S BLEND (Black Tea with natural flavors) Country of Origin: Sri Lanka Region: Uva Shipping Port: Colombo Grade: FP (Flowery Pekoe) Altitude: 5000 – 7000 ft. above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: Light fruity grenadine lifts exotic caramel vanilla creating a unique heavenly flavor. Excellent smooth and mellow finish. Infusion: Bright and Coppery. Ingredients: Luxury organic black tea, Blackberry leaves, Calendula Petals, Natural Flavors Organic Credentials: The Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd. Certified Organic by QMI Organic Inc. Certificate #: Information: From the ancient abbeys of Europe to the more recently established congregations of the New World, monks have been producing food and drink for commercial purposes for millenia. Over the centuries, beer, cheese, pies, chocolates, fudge, sausage, bread, just about anything you can imagine has been made commercially in a monastery somewhere whether in Wisconsin, Belgium, Japan, just about any corner of the globe. The general concept for the seemingly odd arrangement that sees holy men commercially processing foodstuffs, has its roots in the very codes by which monks live their daily lives. The strict codes, written in ancient treatises, emphasize the holiness to be found in a good honest day’s work. (Think of the phrase, idle hands do the devil’s work.) In order to keep from idleness, the monks, who generally lived in the countryside without day jobs, began selling their produce in local markets and fairs throughout Europe. Over the centuries, many of these monastic products, in particular the beers brewed by the Belgian Trappiste monks, have come to enjoy international recognition for their exceptional quality and attention to flavor. Monks Blend, one of our more popular blended teas, serves as a salute to these ancient traditions. Similar to the work ethic of the monks, our dedication to producing a high quality product is almost religious. Like a head monk dictating the quality and standards that must be applied to the day’s production, our Master Taster insists that all teas pass his rigorous inspection. (If you’ve ever been to one of our holiday parties you’d see that this is where any similarities between the two end!) For those of you familiar with our Monk’s Blend, you’ll appreciate this new organic variation. For those of you who aren’t, prepare yourself for an incredible cup that blends the sweetness of pomegranate with the exotic scent of Vanilla. Using the finest organic black tea we could source as our base, we’ve created a cup to raise in the name of keeping busy! Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character of this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea-brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about! LE0807

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Organic Mango Mango Tea 1 oz

$2.75

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Description
ORGANIC MANGO MANGO (Black Tea with natural flavors) Country of Origin: Sri Lanka Region: Uva Shipping Port: Colombo Grade: FP (Flowery Pekoe) Altitude: 5000 – 7000 ft. above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: Piquant and exotic with mysterious fruit notes. The cup has sweetness and delicate hints of island musk that peep out. Makes a superb iced tea. Infusion: Bright and Coppery. Ingredients: Black tea, Mango pieces, Blackberry leaves, Natural Flavors CERTIFYING BODY: NASAA – Australia CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 8048 REFERENCE NUMBER: 8048 DATE OF CERTIFICATE: January 2005 Information: Mango Mango. Yum yum. Mangoes, (Latin: Mangifera indica), the world’s third largest food crop, are also one of the world’s most delicious and oldest fruits. The first known mention of mangoes is found in ancient Hindu scriptures dating back to roughly 4000 BC. The wild version of the fruit was found growing in the foothills of the Himalayas in India and Burma not far from Assam where some of the world’s finest teas would be grown almost 6000 years later! The ancient texts contain many tales about the power of mangoes as a force of love. In one such story, an evil sorceress hunted the daughter of the sun Surya Bai. To evade capture, Surya hid in the forest and turned herself into a golden lotus. The next day her husband set out to look for her. Coming across the lotus he became transfixed and fell in love with its beauty without understanding why. The sorceress became enraged at his discovery and burnt the lotus until it was no more than a pile of ash. Luckily for the man, powerful spirits that lived in the forest overcame the sorceress’ evil and within moments, a mango tree sprouted from the ashes of the lotus, and Surya stepped out of the ripe fruit that dropped to the ground. To this day, mangoes are revered as potent symbols of luck and love in many parts of the Eastern world. We thought we’d do our part to honor this wonderful fruit by blending it with an exceptionally pure organic tea from the Uva highlands of Sri Lanka, considered by many to be one of the finest teas available. This tea captures the pulpy sweetness of mango amazingly with subtle notes of musk and a pleasing astringency. Brew yourself a pot today and wish for true love! Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character on this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea-brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Organic Lapsang Souchong Tea 1 oz

$2.90

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Description
A smooth crisp character with the remarkable and heady aroma of a pine and oak wood fire. Cup tends bright with reddish hues. ORGANIC LAPSANG SOUCHONG (Organic China Black Tea) Country of Origin: China Region: Fujian Province Shipping Port: Fuzhou Grade: Butterfly Lapsang Altitude: 3500’ – 5000’ ft. above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: A smooth crisp character with the remarkable and heady aroma of a pine and oak wood fire. Cup tends bright with reddish hues. Infusion: Tending bright and lively. Ingredients: Luxury organic black tea Organic Credentials: The Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd. Certified Organic by QMI Organic Inc. Certificate #: Information: In life there are many things we tend to love or hate, things for which a middling position is impossible. Consider: Liver and onions. Heavy Metal Music. Getting caught in the rain. You either love ‘em or you hate ‘em. Well now you can add a tea to the list – Lapsang Souchong. Variously compared to a burning campfire or ashtray, the flavor of Lapsang Souchong is to the uninitiated, quite an intense flavor to behold. However, to those who know, the smoky cup of a high quality Fujian Lapsang is second to none, mysteriously miraculous, a feast for the taste buds, truly one of those unique items for which there is no middle ground of appreciation. So how is this miraculous tea produced and who conceived of it in the first place? Well, there is only one way to produce it. Souchong leaves, noted for their thick, rough appearance are withered over burning pine bows, placed in barrels covered with cloth and allowed to ferment. A process which has gone virtually unchanged for hundreds of years. And who came up with the idea? Like many developments in the world of tea there is more than one story. One story maintains that during the Qing Dynasty an army unit passing through a small village decided to camp in a tea factory. Once they were gone, the workers realized that the only way to get the tea ready for the next day’s market was to dry it over a fire. They did exactly that and voila, Lapsang Souchong was born. Story number two describes a situation aboard an English Tea Clipper enroute from China. In this story, waves broke over the deck during a storm and soaked a shipment of Fujian tea. The sailors, recognizing this to be very bad for business decided to dry the tea in large pans set over a campfire. Et voila, Lapsang Souchong was born again. So, take your pick. Which story do you like? May we suggest you mull it over a nice hot cup of tea? Inhale the rich smoky aroma and absorb the mystery of its origins. Next take a sip and note how the smoky sensation fills your mouth in a way no other tea possibly could. Can you tell which side of the love/hate relationship we fall on? It is important to steep Lapsang for slightly less time than you would other teas. Even for a true connoisseur the flavor of an over-steeped Lapsang can be slightly overwhelming. The flavor may also be enhanced with a touch of milk and sugar. In conclusion, we are pleased to offer you this superb tea, especially so considering its organic status. Unlike many inferior Lapsangs that may be grown and flavored with chemicals, this tea is 100% natural. So brew a pot today, and get with the love. Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Even though milk and a dash of sugar help enhance the flavor character on this tea, it is perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’ Iced tea-brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 6 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about! LE0807

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Organic Keemun Panda #1 Tea 1 oz

$2.00

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Description
ORGANIC KEEMUN PANDA #1 (China Organic Black Tea) Country of Origin: China Region: Qimen County, Anhui Province Shipping Port: Shanghai Grade: Organic Panda Grade #1 - whole leaf style Manufacture Type: Special Organic Keemun Cup Characteristics: A complex and subtle flavour. Aromatic and penetrating without being lush or floral. The flavour is best brought out with the use of milk. Infusion: Bright tending reddish CERTIFYING BODY: IMO - Sulgen Switzerland CERTIFICATE NUMBER: CH-SCES 004 REFERENCE NUMBER: 2043/12/02 DATE OF CERTIFICATE: July 8, 2001. (vacuum packed + nitrogen flushed, no quality loss for 12 yrs) Information: Of all the China black teas available Keemun Panda #1 is probably one of the best known. Keemun is one of the congou-type teas; meaning it requires a great deal of gongfu, (disciplined skill) to make into fine taut strips without breaking the leaves. Interestingly the characters in the written Chinese script for time and labor are the same as those used for ‘gongfu’. It is often said that a properly produced Keemun such as Panda #1 is on of the finest teas in the world with a complex aromatic and penetrating character often compared to burgundy wines. Traditionally keemuns were used in English Breakfast tea. In the early 1800’s tea was such the rage in England there was a danger that the British treasury would be drained because all the silver was being used to pay the Chinese for tea. The Chinese did not need textiles, one of Britain’s main exports- so what to do??? India and Burma produced significant quantities of opium and in due course China became a major market. The economic circle that evolved was as follows: : Opium from India was sent to the British merchants stationed in Canton, China. The Chinese paid for this in silver and the merchants received credits against debts in England. This silver was then used to pay the Chinese for their tea. This practice led to wars between England and China - called The Opium Wars. The last war was won by the British in 1860 which led to opium being a legal commodity in China until 1908 when it was finally outlawed. Keemun black tea was only produced after 1875 - against the grain of the Chinese practice of producing green teas. The English palate was finely attuned to fine black tea and with virtually unrestricted trade with opium and tea, Keemun rapidly became an English staple, notwithstanding that keemuns were particularly flavorful and full bodied. This interest in keemun also came about as some describe the taste and aroma of Keemun’s as reminiscent of toast hot from the oven - another British tradition. Keemun is one the best-keeping black teas. Fine specimens will keep for years if stored properly and take on a mellow winey character. Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Milk and a dash of sugar help capture the complex nature of this tea, but it is also perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’. Iced tea brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshly boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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Organic Imperial Keemun Tea 1 oz

$3.65

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Description
ORGANIC IMPERIAL KEEMUN MAO FENG (China Special Black Tea) Country of Origin: China Region: Qimen County, Anhui Province Shipping Port: Shanghai Grade: Imperial Keemun Mao Feng Altitude: up to 5000 feet above sea level Manufacture Type: Orthodox Cup Characteristics: Winey and juicy with a burgundy depth and character. The tea has hints of orchid character. Infusion: A reasonably thick reddish liquor. CERTIFYING BODY: IMO - Sulgen Switzerland CERTIFICATE NUMBER: CH-SCES 004 REFERENCE NUMBER: 2043/12/02 DATE OF CERTIFICATE: July 8, 2001. (vacuum packed + nitrogen flushed, no quality loss for 12 yrs) Information: This Keemun is a particularly fine example of a winey Keemun -very often referred to as the “Bordeaux or Burgundy of Tea”. The tea has a thick rich liquor that has an orchid like fragrance -a fragrance that some say can be enhanced with milk. This grade has tightly rolled leaves that promote a deep rich concentrated flavour - in fact when properly stored takes on a deeper winey and mellow character. This is the third highest grade of Keemun that is available, (the two top grades are Hoa Ya A and Hoa Ya B), and is only made during March and April growing months after which the leaf and cup quality are not sufficient to meet the Imperial Mao Feng grade. The name Keemun comes from Qimen county in southern Anhui province, where almost all the mountains are covered with tea bushes. Qimen county produced only green tea until the mid 1870’s. Around that time a young man in the civil service lost his job. Despite being totally heartbroken and completely embarrassed by his shame, he remembered what his father told him - ‘A skill is a better guarantor of a living than precarious officialdom’. Following this advice, the young man packed up his courage and his bags to travel to Fujian Province to learn the secrets of black tea manufacturing. Upon his return to Qimen in 1875 he set up three factories to produce black tea. The black tea method was perfectly suited to the tea leaves produced in this warm moist climate with well drained sandy soil. Before long, the superb flavor of Keemuns became very popular around the world. Despite its relatively short history (for a Chinese tea!) Keemun became world renown by 1915 and in taste tests conducted by the leading tea companies of the day, was preferred over Darjeeling! 1915 also marked another milestone in Imperial Keemun’s storied history - it won gold at the International Exposition in Panama. Even though in recent years tea connoisseurs have taken more to Assams and Ceylon black teas, Imperial Keemun Mao Feng remains ‘king of the black teas”. Hot tea brewing method: Bring freshly drawn cold water to a rolling boil. Place 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup into the teapot. Pour the boiling water into the teapot. Cover and let steep for 3-7 minutes according to taste (the longer the steeping time the stronger the tea). Milk and a dash of sugar help capture the complex nature of this tea, but it is also perfectly acceptable to consume this tea ‘straight-up’. Iced tea brewing method: (to make 1 liter/quart): Place 5 teaspoons of tea into a teapot or heat resistant pitcher. Pour 1 1/4 cups of freshlyx boiled water over the tea. Steep for 5 minutes. Quarter fill a serving pitcher with cold water. Pour the tea into your serving pitcher straining the leaves. Add ice and top-up the pitcher with cold water. Garnish and sweeten to taste. [A rule of thumb when preparing fresh brewed iced tea is to double the strength of hot tea since it will be poured over ice and diluted with cold water]. Please note that this tea may tend to go cloudy or ‘milky’ when poured over ice; a perfectly normal characteristic of some high quality black teas and nothing to worry about!

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